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John W. Verity

NoSQL Gets a Big Yes

John W. Verity
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Taimoor Zubar
Taimoor Zubar
1/31/2012 6:43:44 PM
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Re: Flexibility
But I think you have to give it to the big names like Oracle and DB2 that were behind the invention and creation of RDBMS. The amount of research they did was going to pay off at some point in time.

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John W. Verity
John W. Verity
1/31/2012 6:36:23 PM
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Re: Flexibility
Yes, Taimoor, I believe NoSQL is going to make its mark in certain areas and not in others. But let's not forget, relational/SQL came onto the scene when something called the hierarchical DBMS was king, and nobody foresaw that RDBMS would find use as widespread as it has since then.

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Taimoor Zubar
Taimoor Zubar
1/31/2012 6:12:19 PM
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Re: Flexibility
@John: So, are you saying NoSQL will only make a mark in selected areas for specific uses and won't go as widespread as SQL is?

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John W. Verity
John W. Verity
1/31/2012 10:53:13 AM
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Re: Flexibility
NO, NoSQL cannot do everything that an SQL database can do. Mainly, the relational databases maintain transactional integrity: When you move money from one bank account to another, for instance, there are changes made to two different account records, and the database must make sure that eith  both of those changes are recorded or neither is recorded. So, either a multi-part transaction gets fully completed, with all of its parts accomplished, or it does not get completed, with none of its parts recorded. If the transaction fails mid-stream, any parts that were recorded - any data that was changed so far - must be rolled back to their original state. This is necessary, of course, for handling financial and others kinds of important transactions.

  No SQL is more about organizing and finding large numbers of items and keeping track of their relationships. It's not used to run banks, more to run, say, large catalogs of merchandise, such as at Amazon.

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Taimoor Zubar
Taimoor Zubar
1/31/2012 6:19:25 AM
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Basic Coder
Re: NoSQL for BI?
My feeling is that if you have to use NoSQL for BI, you'd have to build-up an entire new BI layer designed specifically for NoSQL. It may not work with existing BI components that are programmed to work with RDBMS.

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Taimoor Zubar
Taimoor Zubar
1/31/2012 6:06:29 AM
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Basic Coder
Flexibility
It may be faster and easy-to-use, but does NoSQL offers the same flexibility that conventional SQL allows to developers? Would it be possible to do everything with NoSQL that can be done through SQL queries?

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John W. Verity
John W. Verity
1/30/2012 11:49:55 PM
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Re: NoSQL and Amazon
Me, too, @scucci, which is why I wrote about. I am not sure why Monash is dismissing it out of hand. Perhaps it's because Amazon has, in fact, talked about much of this in the past. It has a related product called SimpleDB, which has gained lots of attention over the past couple of years:

 


"Amazon SimpleDB is a highly available and flexible non-relational data store that offloads the work of database administration. Developers simply store and query data items via web services requests and Amazon SimpleDB does the rest.

"Unbound by the strict requirements of a relational database, Amazon SimpleDB is optimized to provide high availability and flexibility, with little or no administrative burden. Behind the scenes, Amazon SimpleDB creates and manages multiple geographically distributed replicas of your data automatically to enable high availability and data durability. The service charges you only for the resources actually consumed in storing your data and serving your requests. You can change your data model on the fly, and data is automatically indexed for you. With Amazon SimpleDB, you can focus on application development without worrying about infrastructure provisioning, high availability, software maintenance, schema and index management, or performance tuning."


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scucci
scucci
1/30/2012 10:06:40 PM
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Re: NoSQL and Amazon
I'm interested to see why he's downplaying this? Has this been done before? Is he throwing this off as "the flavor of the month"? If amazon uses it, I'd keep my eye's on it.

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John W. Verity
John W. Verity
1/29/2012 9:54:44 PM
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Re: NoSQL and Amazon
I asked Curt Monash, perhaps the leading analyst of all things database, and he dismissed Amazon's DynamoDB as nothing particularly important. I didn't bother him to ask why that is so, but I will. Stay tuned.

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scucci
scucci
1/28/2012 10:12:12 AM
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Basic Coder
Re: NoSQL and Amazon
That's a very good question - This seems like something that's going to grow in the next couple years. No longer do you have to pay for clunky datbases with an overpriced DBA. 

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